China

China maritime customs medals 1932

China Customs Maritime medal, 1932

CN 001 Shoulder Patch old Style

China Customs insignia old style

Georg Gruber / Roy Stammwitz collection

CN 002 Shoulder Patch current Style

China Customs insignia current style

Georg Gruber / Roy Stammwitz collection

CN 003 Shoulder Patch Water Customs

China Customs water insignia

Roy Stammwitz collection

CN 004 Shoulder Patch Dog Handler

China Customs K9 unit insignia

Roy Stammwitz collection

CN 005 Breast Patch Dog Handler

China Customs K9 unit breast patch insignia

Roy Stammwitz collection

CN 006 Shoulder Loops Rank Insignia Ceremonial Uniform

China Customs ceremonial unit insignia - Old style

Roy Stammwitz collection

CN 007 Shoulder Loops Rank Insignia Water Customs

China Customs water insignia

Roy Stammwitz collection

01 current rank 58483

China Customs - Current rank insignia
Information and images courtesy Dong Wei

02 current rank 58481

China Customs - Current rank insignia
Information and images courtesy Dong Wei

03 current rank 58415

China Customs - Current rank insignia
Information and images courtesy Dong Wei

04 current rank 58420

China Customs - Current rank insignia
Information and images courtesy Dong Wei

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Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs cap badge ( 1863-1912).

In 1863 an Irishman, Robert HART, was appointed Inspector General of the Customs Bureau in Peking. HART expanded the Customs Bureau into a Department of the Chinese Government, . The Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs under HART not only collected tariffs but also charted the Chinese coast, managed government port facilities, supervised the discharging of cargo in coastal and inland waterways and established a postal service. At that time the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs provided about half the revenue of the Ch'ing Dynasty. In 1912, with the demise of the Qing Dynasty and the formation of the Republic of China, it became the Chinese Maritime Customs.

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China Customs Hat Badge

At the top of the badge is the Communist 5 pointed star, Underneath which is the Great Peoples Hall in Beijing. At the bottom of this, inside the wreath, is the symbol of Hermes-Caduceus, which stands for international trade. Customs guards the interests of the state and promotes trade and friendly contact.